Posts Tagged ‘spoof’

Accessing Free Guangzhou Airport Wi-Fi on MacBook Pro

Saturday, December 2nd, 2017

Guangzhou airport has a crazy way of providing free wifi. If you have a Chinese phone you can receive a login account via text, but if you don’t have a Chinese number, then you have to go to a physical ticket machine, scan your passport, and quickly jot down (or photograph) the code that flashes on the screen for 15 seconds.

Once you have this code, you have to click “Ticket Cert” on the login page and enter the info.

This worked fine for me on my iPhone.

But when I tried to follow the same steps on my laptop, the “Ticket Cert” option did not appear on my browser login prompt. I saw a slightly different page that only had the SMS option (and a bunch of half-loaded CSS and javascript errors).

I tried many things including spoofing the UserAgent on my browser. Nothing seemed to work.

Finally, I changed the MAC address on my laptop to match my already-online iphone’s

ifconfig en0 ether [iphone's "Wi-Fi Address"]

This worked.

PS: So far, I have not managed to get any sort of vpn, proxy or ssh tunnelling to work.

MAC Address Spoofing on Mac OS X for unlimited free hour passes on xfinitywifi and CableWiFi networks

Friday, July 8th, 2016

From what I gather, xfinity charges people to “rent” wifi routers and then uses that hardware to host pay-per-use public wifi networks. These networks are usually named xfinitywifi or CableWiFi. Every 24 hours each MAC Address is granted a “$0.00 Complimentary Free Pass”:

  1. CLICK I am not an XFINITY customer
  2. CLICK Sign Up
  3. CHOOSE $0.00 for a Complimentary Hour Pass
  4. CLICK Start Session

To “spoof” a new wifi MAC Address on MAC OS X, one can issue:

ifconfig en0 | grep ether

This will spit out a number like: 70:51:81:c1:3f:6e. Record this number. To set your MAC address to a random yet valid address use:

sudo ifconfig en0 ether `openssl rand -hex 6 | sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g; s/.$//'`

Then, later, if you want to return to your old address issue:

ifconfig en0 ether 70:51:81:c1:3f:6e

It seems that System Preferences > Network > Advanced > Hardware will reveal your original MAC address in case you forget it.

You can also place these commands as aliases in your ~/.profile:

alias random_mac="ifconfig en0 ether \`openssl rand -hex 6 | sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g; s/.$//'\`"
alias reset_mac="ifconfig en0 ether 70:56:81:c0:3f:6d"
alias sudo='sudo '

This all assumes en0 is your wifi location. It might be en1 on other macs.